Look for the Helpers

by Justin Triemstra

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news,

my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers.

You will always find people who are helping.’”

                                                                                                                                                   -Fred RogersRead More »

Called to Serve: A Medical Student Response to Canceled Classes and Rotations in the Pandemic

By Elizabeth Southworth

“So what’s the plan for the students” asked my attending during morning rounds on Monday March 16th. We were discussing the many changes that had already occurred over the past several days; the rooms in the Surgical ICU that had been sequestered for possible corona virus patients, the restrictions on visitors to the hospital, and the impending decision regarding 3rd and 4th year medical students on clinical rotations. Moments later the email came in – “All M3 and M4 students will immediately stop participating in their clinical clerkships or those electives that involve patient contact”. With those words, my 4th year of medical school came dramatically to a halt.Read More »

The Guilt Does Not Go Away: A Physician’s Tribute to Elephant Mothers

By Maha Mahdavinia

It started almost from the moment my son was born, after I held that precious little breathing miracle of life in my arms and he stopped crying right away. I was filled with joy and love, as if beautiful, peaceful music was playing in my ears. I wanted to hold him all the time and never leave him. Then I remembered: My maternity leave was only six weeks. All of a sudden, the music stopped. It was replaced by a gnawing pain in my belly. Not from the unexpected ruptures of birth — I couldn’t care about those less at that moment. The pain came from guilt. In six weeks I would have to leave my baby every day, from very early in the morning until six or seven at night, when I came back from the hospital. I was a medical resident, and my work hours were long and uncompromising. As I sat in the recovery room of the maternity ward, my mind turned from awe and wonder to anguish and doubt. What was I thinking having a baby? I was so busy with work, and my job was very stressful. Surely I wouldn’t be a good mother.Read More »

Avoiding Compassion Fatigue: Drain Less, Recharge More

By Eran Magen

You open yourself up to the pain of others, in order to be a comforting presence in the middle of a terrible experience. It helps them, and it drains you. It is exhausting to experience so much secondhand suffering. Over time, it sucks the color out of your own life, leaves you depleted, less able to connect with the next person and to enjoy your own life.Read More »

10:56 – The Minute a Patient’s Life Ends and a Medical Student’s Life Changes

By Rachael D’Auria

The hierarchy in medicine, dark humor used to cope with difficult patients, and embarrassment of not knowing answers to endless questions being thrown your way are some of the many horror stories students above me have attempted to prepare me for. However, no amount of preparation could prepare me for witnessing my first death.Read More »

“I Shall Be Released.” Restorative Justice Techniques Can Address Healthcare Burnout & Attrition

by Jay Behel

Burnout, provider dissatisfaction, and attrition remain at near-epidemic proportions among healthcare providers. A 2017 survey found that 39% of physicians reported significant burnout, and nearly a third of physicians were contemplating leaving practice in a 2012 survey.  Nurses seemed to be faring better in a survey released earlier this year with only 15% reporting burnout. However, 41% reported feeling disengaged from their work.

The myriad wellness programs launched to address these problems have disproportionately focused on private, individual aspects of wellbeing like diet, fatigue, and exercise offering similarly individual solutions like yoga and meditation.

Missing from the strategy to help healthcare providers is a coherent plan to address the systemic, communal factors underpinning the crisis, namely the disengagement and isolation fostered by our mechanized and monetized healthcare environment.

While they’re often reserved for use in criminal justice settings, community-building and conflict resolution practices rooted in the philosophy of restorative justice offer a remedy for the alienation of the contemporary healthcare provider and, perhaps, our entire healthcare system.

I began looking for ways to introduce RJ practices at Rush Medical College in Chicago after attending a training in California.  While the whole experience had a powerful impact on how I think about my work as a healthcare leader, I was most struck by the flexibility of the circle practices—their ability to make space for the silly and the serious, for simple connection and complex problem-solving.  I was also impressed by the speed and apparent ease with which participants, myself included, made themselves vulnerable and voiced hard truths.

Following this experience, I brought training to our campus, and our student leaders subsequently held a series of restorative justice circles to address tensions over a curricular transition. Participating students expressed their needs and, ultimately, reaffirmed their commitment to respect and care for one another. After the circles, the number of students reporting peer conflict and incivility dropped.  Moreover, several students noted that the experience of sitting in circle completely changed their sense of the learning environment and their place in it. One student noted: “I feel that I have gained social capital knowing that there is a community of peers I can reach out to whenever I need support.“

Rooted in indigenous traditions, restorative justice (RJ) is a theory that emphasizes building community and repairing harm through cooperative processes that include all stakeholders.  RJ practices convene groups of people to engage in meaningful dialogue about substantive issues that impact community and individual functioning. These processes can help a group identify and gain mutual understanding of both the personal and collective sources of disconnection, create the conditions that incentivize growth, and build or rebuild trust.

One essential RJ practice is the community-building circle.  A circle is usually convened around a desire to both build connections and address tensions and conflicts disrupting the group’s ability to fully function as a community. Guided by a trained circle-keeper and structured around the use of a talking piece, community-building circles provide safe, inclusive space for the revelation of issues both large and small, personal and universal.

More fundamentally for the healthcare space, RJ, particularly circle practices foster the personal connection and humanistic values that brought most people to the field in the first place. Healthcare institutions in New Zealand and Australia are leading the way in employing restorative practices.

Integrating these practices certainly requires an up-front commitment of time and money, and RJ-driven culture change takes time and inevitably involves some moments of painful self-examination at both the personal and institutional levels.

Nevertheless, the pay-off over time, in reduced attrition, increased provider satisfaction, and better patient care, would greatly outstrip the initial investment. And, in an industry that has become so focused on efficiency and metrics, RJ may be key to building capacity.

While these practices alone cannot repair our fractured healthcare landscape, they do offer a roadmap by which providers can navigate the terrain with their souls intact.

 

Jay Behel, PhD, is Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Rush Medical College in Chicago.  He is a Public Voices Fellow with the OpEd Project.

Speaking of Addiction…

By Meaghan P. Ruddy

When we speak of addiction, there is a lot we can say. We can talk about stigmatization, how stigma is a mark, a signifier of something often associated with shame and disgrace, which in turn are responses to things deemed problematic by dominant cultural narratives. We could focus on historical usages of stigmatizing practices, how we come to know disgrace and feel shame by observing how others, particularly those who are in helper roles, respond to our marks, and how all of this negatively impacts healthcare. And we could, as we often do, speak about it from the safe, professional distance of the theoretical.

But there is a simpler truth here.

It is the truth expressed by the civil rights movement, the equity in marriage movement, and women’s suffrage. It is the truth that fuels both political correctness and the fight against it. It is the truth that language matters.

Think about it. If it didn’t matter, we would never take offense, never laugh at a joke, never tear up at a well-delivered line in a film or speech. No one would bristle at terms with historically racist or fascist overtones.

Yet, we do.

Healthcare has made some progress but our work is far from over. The person-first language movement has done a lot of good; even the CDC-recommended terms of use for people with disabilities. Even the word healthcare is a relatively new and welcome reframing away from the silos implied by medical care, rehabilitation, nursing care, etc. The harsh terminology that was once part and parcel of “clinical-speak,” handicapped, gomer, diabetic, depressive, has largely been abated or is at least on the way out. There has been wide-spread recognition that these are people first, conditions second.

Except. Except for one challenging, and unfortunately swiftly growing population.

Addict.

Drug-seeker.

Yeah, but c’mon, someone might say. They are seeking drugs. They’re a huge problem! They should know better.Read More »